South American Conference on History. Symposium on Religious Practice by Non-Europeans in Ibero-America

South American Conference on History. Symposium on Religious Practice by Non-Europeans in Ibero-America

Organizer
II Congreso Sulamericano de Historia
Location
Passo Fundo, Brazil
Country
Brazil
From - Until
15.06.2005 -
Deadline
15.06.2005
By
Leo J. Garofalo

Organized within the larger II Congreso Sulamericano de Historia to be held in Passo Fundo, Brazil on October 19-21, 2005, the symposium is composed of three panels that analyze the uses and significance that the local non-European populations gave to European-origin religions and religious institutions in Ibero-America in the colonial and republican periods.

Panel 1: Indians, Castas and the Colonial Church
Panel 2: Africans and the Church in Latin America
Panel 3: Faith and Nation in the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries

Paper proposals (title, description of 25 lines, and name and institutional affiliation) can be submitted in Spanish, English, or Portuguese by e-mailed to leo.garofalo@conncoll.edu by June 15, 2005. Keep in mind that the organizers of the Congreso plan to publish the texts of papers and require their submission by September 15 (length 20.000-70.000 characters). As organizers of the symposium, we will ask to see the texts at least a week before that date.

Description:
The symposium analyzes the uses and significance that the local non-European populations gave to European-origin religions and religious institutions in Ibero-America (South America) in the colonial and republican periods.

We propose the following themes and questions for examination in the symposium:

• What space for action did ecclesiastical institutions allow non-European populations to forge ethnic identity? To what extent did ecclesiastical and religious personnel give power to non-European groups?

• How and in what cases did these social grups appropriate and resignify both Christianity and non-Christian concepts and elements?

• To what measure did the transformations of state-church relations contribuye to the consolidation of an identity rooted in relgion?

• How did nineteenth-century European migrations contribute to the diversification of these identities and popular religious practices in South America?

Programm

Contact (announcement)

Leo Garofalo
Assistant Professor of History
Winthrop Hall
Connecticut College
270 Mohegan Ave.
New London, CT 06320

fon (860)439-2098
fax (860)439-5332
Email: lgar@conncoll.edu

http://2csh.clio.pro.br/english/
Editors Information
Published on
03.06.2005
Contributor